Google Play Metadata Rules Updated for Improved User Experience

January 6, 2017

Google Play Metadata Rules Updated for Improved User Experience

Google has updated its metadata rules in order to create an improved experience for users. The new rules outline suggestions based on appropriate content, as well as best practices for highlighting your app’s best features in the Google Play store. Many of the new updates simply reflect what Google has been saying all along – don’t lie about the functionality of your app, don’t stuff unrelated keywords into your description, and don’t use the names of other apps out of context. In the below screenshot, Google outlines how some developers try to scam their way to rankings by stuffing inappropriate keywords into their app descriptions. playpolicy-spam01 In case the above points aren’t clear, Google outlines specifically what they are not looking to see in a description:

  1. User testimonials
  2. Excessive details
  3. Misleading references to other apps or products
  4. Further misleading references
  5. Repetitive, excessive, or irrelevant keywords

When writing a Google Play description, it is important that you use keywords that are relevant for your app. Placing those keywords in a Google Play-friendly location of your description, such as at the front of a sentence, can also help you pick up rankings, no keyword-stuffing needed. Google then goes on to list examples of inappropriate text, images, or videos within your app listing:

  • Imagery or videos with sexually suggestive content. Avoid suggestive imagery containing breasts, buttocks, genitalia or other fetishized anatomy or content, whether illustrated or real.
  • Language inappropriate for a general audience. Avoid profane and vulgar language in your app listing. If it is a critical element of your app, you must censor its presentation within the Store listing.
  • Graphic violence prominently depicted in app icons, promotional images, or videos.
  • Depictions of the illicit usage of drugs. Even EDSA (Educational, Scientific, or Artistic) content must be suitable for all audience within the Store listing.

Finally, Google lists off several best practices to adhere to when crafting your app listing.

  • Highlight what’s great about your app. Share interesting and exciting facts about your app to help users understand what makes you app special.
  • Make sure that your app’s title and description accurately describe your app’s functionality.
  • Avoid using repetitive or unrelated keywords or references.

These are just a few of the tips that Google had in store. To see the rest, head over to their Metadata page. For the most part, these tips go along with what ASO experts have recommended. Keep the focus on your app, not on testimonials or competing app names, and Google should have no problem with your app’s metadata.